Back pain: Exercises to improve bad posture and protect against lower backache

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Back pain can be annoying and frustrating, but it usually improves by itself within a few weeks or months. You could lower your chances of ever developing back pain by making just a few changes to your posture.

Lower back pain is the most common type of back pain, although it can develop anywhere along the spine or neck.

Most of the time, your back pain won’t be caused by anything serious, and should get better over time.

You could prevent back pain from ever developing by making just a few changes to your posture.

Poor posture can disrupt the delicate balance of weight on your spine, which weakens individual tissues and leads to back pain.

READ MORE: Three of the best foods to prevent back pain

The best way to correct bad posture is to strengthen the muscles in the back, according to FLYLDN head of pilates, Chiara Becuti.

You may have picked up bad posture habits throughout your daily life without even knowing it, however.

Slouching is the most common cause of bad posture, while lying on your belly in bed could also lead to back pain.

Hunching forward or lifting heavy objects without bending your knees have all been linked to back pain, but these exercises could lower your risk of backache in the future. But, you should speak to a doctor first if you’re pregnant, or if you’re new to Pilates.

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Wall Angel

“Stand with your back against the wall with the wrists, elbows, head, shoulders, back, bottom, and one heel touching the wall,” Becuti told Express.co.uk.

“Raise your hands slowly until they are over your head, then lower your hands until they are even with your shoulders. Ensure they remain against the wall and repeat five to ten times.”

Starfish through the door

“Walking through a door with arms open, press the hands against the door frame slightly lower than shoulder height.

“This exercise will make you feel in charge of your posture and is a great stretch for the pecs, which get tight when you slouch forward.”

Chest Opener

“Sitting tall with your arms right in front of you, hands in prayer position.

“Inhale and draw your arms out and back. Take deep breaths and you will feel your chest and shoulders opening up.

“Squeeze the shoulder blades and then repeat. 

Isometric rows

“Bend your arms so your fingers are facing forward, and your palms are facing each other.

“Exhale as you draw your elbows back behind you and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Hold this position for 10 seconds, then slowly release to the starting position.”

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